Virbac USA

FAQs

Products

  • Are C.E.T.® VEGGIEDENT® FR3SH® Tartar Control Chews for Dogs hypoallergenic?

    C.E.T.® VEGGIEDENT® FR3SH® Tartar Control Chews for Dogs are vegetable based chews and do not contain any animal proteins. C.E.T.®VEGGIEDENT® FR3SH® Chews do contain grain proteins.

  • Are CLINTABS® Tablets flavored?

    No. The tablets are not flavored.

  • Are CLINTABS® Tablets scored?

    The 25mg and 75mg CLINTABS Tablets are scored or bisected. The 150mg CLINTABS Tablet is not scored or bisected.

  • At what age can my dog start taking IVERHART MAX® (ivermectin/pyrantel pamoate/praziquantel) Soft Chew?

    IVERHART MAX Soft Chew is labeled for dogs and puppies 8 weeks of age and older.

  • Can CLINTABS® Tablets be used for cats?

    CLINTABS Tablets are labeled for use in dogs only. Virbac has not conducted any safety or efficacy studies for this product on cats.

  • Can CLINTABS® Tablets be used in pregnant or breeding dogs?

    The safety in pregnant females or breeding males has not been established.

  • Can a pregnant or lactating dog consume IVERHART MAX® (ivermectin/pyrantel pamoate/praziquantel) Soft Chew?

    The safe use of this drug has not been evaluated in pregnant or lactating dogs.

  • Do CLINTABS® Tablets need to be given with a meal?

    It is not necessary to give the tablet with a meal.

  • Does IVERHART MAX® (ivermectin/pyrantel pamoate/praziquantel) Soft Chew need to be chewed by a dog for it to be effective?

    It is important that the dog ingests the entire dose and care should be taken to ensure this happens. If it is suspected that any of the dose has been lost, redosing is recommended.

  • Does KETOCHLOR® shampoo have an expiration date?

    Yes; the expiration date is located on the lower part of the back label.

  • Does the KETOCHLOR® Shampoo have a fragrance?

    Yes; mountain flower is the fragrance.

  • How long should the KETOCHLOR® Shampoo have contact with the skin prior to rinsing?

    Shake well before use. Wet the hair coat with water. Apply a thin line of shampoo from the base of the neck to the base of the tail. Massage shampoo over the pet's body to ensure good contact with the skin. Allow to remain on hair coat for 5 to 10 minutes, then rinse thoroughly and repeat.

  • How many calories are in C.E.T.® VEGGIEDENT® FR3SH® Tartar Control Chews for Dogs?

    The calorie content varies on the size of the chew: Extra -Small: 23 kcal/chew, Small: 73 kcal/chew, Medium: 101.5 kcal/chew, Large: 101.5 kcal/chew.

  • How much EPA and DHA are in one ALLERDERM OMEGADERM® Essential Fatty Acids Supplement?

    The product is made up of 4.7% EPA and 3.3% DHA. For the 4mL packet: 179.2 mg EPA and 120 mg DHA. For the 8mL packet: 358.4 mg EPA and 240 mg DHA.

  • How often should KETOCHLOR® Shampoo be used?

    Always use as directed by your veterinarian. An initial frequency of 2 to 3 times per week for 4 weeks then once a week afterward, is a common frequency. Once again, follow your veterinarian's directions for use.

  • My dog is allergic to certain proteins. Can my dog take IVERHART MAX® Soft Chew (ivermectin/pyrantel pamoate/praziquantel)?

    IVERHART MAX Soft Chew contains poultry as the only animal protein. Although "bacon flavored" it does not contain any pork proteins. If your dog has an allergy to chicken, we recommend you consult with your veterinarian before use of this medication.

  • What are the common side effects associated with CLINTABS® Tablets?

    Vomiting and diarrhea were the most common side effects observed in either clinical trials or during clinical use.

  • What are the labeled indications for IVERHART MAX® Soft Chew (ivermectin/pyrantel pamoate/praziquantel)?

    IVERHART MAX Soft Chew prevents canine heartworm disease by eliminating the tissue stage of heartworm larvae (Dirofilaria immitis) for a month (30 days) after infection and for the treatment and control of roundworms (Toxocara canis, Toxascaris leonina), hookworms (Ancylostoma caninum, Uncinaria stenocephala, Ancylostoma braziliense), and tapeworms (Dipylidium caninum, Taenia pisiformis).

  • What is S-I-S SKIN INNOVATIVE SCIENCE® Technology?

    It is the combination of glycotechnology to provide anti-adhesive effects of micro-organisms through the use of structural sugars and the Defensin technology to promote natural skin bacterial defenses through the use of plant extracts.

  • What plant extracts are used in Defensin technology?

    Boldo extract and Meadowsweet extract.

  • How many calories are in one ALLERDERM OMEGADERM® Essential Fatty Acids Supplement?

    The calorie content varies depending on the size of each packet. Small: 31.3 kcal per 4 mL packet, Large: 62.6 kcal per 8 mL packet

  • What is the flavoring/protein source for ANXITANE® (L-Theanine) Chewable Tablets?

    It is chicken liver flavored.

  • Can ANXITANE® (L-Theanine) Chewable Tablets be used for separation anxiety?

    ANXITANE Tablets promote relaxation in dogs and cats that are exhibiting nervousness, environmentally induced stress and or are anxious. It is not intended for use in animals with severe phobias, separation anxiety, or in animals with a known history of aggression.

  • Can ANXITANE® (L-Theanine) Chewable Tablets be given with other medications?

    ANXITANE Tablets can be given for the life of your pet, as well as with other medications.

  • Can BIOMOX® (amoxicillin) Tablets and BIOMOX® (amoxicillin) Oral Suspension be used for cats?

    BIOMOX Tablets and BIOMOX Suspension are labeled for use in dogs only. Virbac has not conducted any safety or efficacy studies for this product on cats.

  • What is the flavor of BIOMOX® (amoxicillin) Oral Suspension?

    It is an artificial cherry flavor.

  • Where do the hides come from to make C.E.T.® Enzymatic Oral Hygiene Chews for dogs?

    The hides used to make our rawhide chews come from North American cattle.

  • How many calories are in C.E.T.® Enzymatic Oral Hygiene Chews for Dogs?

    The calorie content varies depending on the size of each chew. Petite: 27 kcal, Medium: 31 kcal, Large: 65 kcal and Extra-Large: 89 kcal

  • What is the protein source for C.E.T.® Enzymatic Oral Hygiene Chews for Dogs?

    The chews contain both beef and poultry proteins.

  • What is the difference between C.E.T.® Enzymatic Oral Hygiene Chews and C.E.T.® HEXTRA® Premium Chews for Dogs?

    C.E.T. Enzymatic Oral Hygiene Chews feature an exclusive Dual-Enzyme System, plus a coarse texture that works with the dog’s chewing action to reduce plaque and calculus. C.E.T. HEXTRA Premium Chews are made using the unique and proprietary binding-releasing system to ensure maximal release of chlorhexidine, which helps reduce plaque and calculus. Activity resulting from chlorhexidine release may be evident for up to 24 hours.1,2

    1. Pader, Morton. Oral Hygiene Products and Practice. New York: Marcel Dekker, Inc., 1988.
    2. Bonesvoll, P “Oral Pharmacology of Chlorhexidine.” Journal of Clinical Periodontology, 4.5(1977): 49-65.
  • I would like to begin a food allergy trial on one of my patients. Which C.E.T.® Enzymatic Toothpaste do you recommend?

    C.E.T. Enzymatic Toothpaste with vanilla-mint flavor does not contain any animal or grain proteins.

  • What is the protein source for C.E.T.® HEXTRA® Premium Oral Hygiene Chews for Dogs?

    The chews contain both beef and poultry proteins.

  • How many calories are in C.E.T.® HEXTRA® Premium Oral Hygiene Chews for Dogs?

    The calorie content varies depending on the size of each chew. Petite: 29 kcal, Medium: 30 kcal, Large: 63 kcal and Extra-Large: 86 kcal

  • Where do the hides come from to make C.E.T.® HEXTRA® Premium Oral Hygiene Chews for Dogs?

    The hides used to make our rawhide chews come from North American cattle.

  • How many calories are in C.E.T.® VEGGIEDENT® Tartar Control Chews for Dogs?

    The calorie content varies depending on the size of the chew.  Extra-Small: 23 kcal/chew, Small: 73 kcal/chew, Regular: 101.5 kcal/chew

  • Are C.E.T.® VEGGIEDENT® Tartar Control Chews for Dogs hypoallergenic?

    C.E.T. VEGGIEDENT Chews are vegetable-based chews and do not contain any animal proteins. C.E.T. VEGGIEDENT Chews do contain grain proteins.

  • Why should I use EPI-OTIC® Advanced Ear Cleanser?

    EPI-OTIC Advanced Ear Cleanser is a non-irritating cleanser.  It features innovative glycotechnology.

  • How long do I leave EPI-SOOTHE® Cream Rinse on my pet before washing it off?

    Leave the product on for 5-10 minutes, then lightly rinse.

  • Can I use EPI-SOOTHE® Shampoo on a pregnant or lactating animal?

    The safe use of this product has not been evaluated in pregnant or lactating dogs.

  • What is the flavoring in IVERHART PLUS® (ivermectin/pyrantel) Flavored Chewables?

    It is pork liver flavored.

    IVERHART PLUS® (ivermectin/pyrantel) Flavored Chewables - For oral use in dogs only. All dogs should be tested for heartworm infection before starting a preventive program. In clinical trials with ivermectin/pyrantel, vomiting or diarrhea within 24 hours of dosing was rarely observed. Adverse reactions following the use of ivermectin include: Depression/lethargy, vomiting, anorexia, diarrhea, mydriasis, ataxia, staggering, convulsions and hypersalivation. Please see full product label.

  • What are the labeled indications for IVERHART PLUS® (ivermectin/pyrantel) Flavored Chewables?

    IVERHART PLUS Flavored Chewables prevent canine heartworm disease by eliminating the tissue stage of heartworm larvae (Dirofilaria immitis) for a month (30 days) after infection and for the treatment and control of roundworms (Toxocara canis, Toxascaris leonina) and hookworms (Ancylostoma caninum, Uncinaria stenocephala, Ancylostoma braziliense).

    IVERHART PLUS® (ivermectin/pyrantel) Flavored Chewables - For oral use in dogs only. All dogs should be tested for heartworm infection before starting a preventive program. In clinical trials with ivermectin/pyrantel, vomiting or diarrhea within 24 hours of dosing was rarely observed. Adverse reactions following the use of ivermectin include: Depression/lethargy, vomiting, anorexia, diarrhea, mydriasis, ataxia, staggering, convulsions and hypersalivation. Please see full product label.

  • What adverse reactions may be observed with use of IVERHART PLUS® (ivermectin/pyrantel) Flavored Chewables?

    IVERHART PLUS® (ivermectin/pyrantel) Flavored Chewables - For oral use in dogs only. All dogs should be tested for heartworm infection before starting a preventive program. In clinical trials with ivermectin/pyrantel, vomiting or diarrhea within 24 hours of dosing was rarely observed. Adverse reactions following the use of ivermectin include: Depression/lethargy, vomiting, anorexia, diarrhea, mydriasis, ataxia, staggering, convulsions and hypersalivation. Please see full product label.

     

  • At what age can my dog start IVERHART PLUS® (ivermectin/pyrantel) Flavored Chewables?

    IVERHART PLUS Flavored Chewables are recommended for dogs 6 weeks of age and older.

    IVERHART PLUS® (ivermectin/pyrantel) Flavored Chewables - For oral use in dogs only. All dogs should be tested for heartworm infection before starting a preventive program. In clinical trials with ivermectin/pyrantel, vomiting or diarrhea within 24 hours of dosing was rarely observed. Adverse reactions following the use of ivermectin include: Depression/lethargy, vomiting, anorexia, diarrhea, mydriasis, ataxia, staggering, convulsions and hypersalivation. Please see full product label.

  • Do IVERHART PLUS® (ivermectin/pyrantel) Flavored Chewables need to be chewed by a dog for it to be effective?

    Dogs can be dosed with IVERHART PLUS Flavored Chewables whole for swallowing or they may be chewed.  It is important that the dog ingests the entire dose and care should be taken to ensure this happens.  If it is suspected that any of the dose has been lost, redosing is recommended.

    IVERHART PLUS® (ivermectin/pyrantel) Flavored Chewables - For oral use in dogs only. All dogs should be tested for heartworm infection before starting a preventive program. In clinical trials with ivermectin/pyrantel, vomiting or diarrhea within 24 hours of dosing was rarely observed. Adverse reactions following the use of ivermectin include: Depression/lethargy, vomiting, anorexia, diarrhea, mydriasis, ataxia, staggering, convulsions and hypersalivation. Please see full product label.

  • Can dogs in active reproductive status be given IVERHART PLUS® (ivermectin/pyrantel) Flavored Chewables?

    Ivermectin/pyrantel has shown a wide margin of safety at the recommended dose level in dogs, including pregnant or breeding females and male dogs and puppies aged 6 or more weeks.

    IVERHART PLUS® (ivermectin/pyrantel) Flavored Chewables - For oral use in dogs only. All dogs should be tested for heartworm infection before starting a preventive program. In clinical trials with ivermectin/pyrantel, vomiting or diarrhea within 24 hours of dosing was rarely observed. Adverse reactions following the use of ivermectin include: Depression/lethargy, vomiting, anorexia, diarrhea, mydriasis, ataxia, staggering, convulsions and hypersalivation. Please see full product label.

  • Can KETOCHLOR® Shampoo be used on a pregnant or lactating animal?

    Virbac does not have any safety studies for use of KETOCHLOR Shampoo on pregnant or lactating animals.

  • Does KETOCHLOR® Shampoo have any age restrictions?

    Virbac does not have any age restrictions for use of KETOCHLOR Shampoo.

  • Can MOVOFLEX® Soft Chews be given to dogs of any size?

    MOVOFLEX Soft Chews are available in 3 sizes: Small-sized dogs up to 40 lbs. (<18 kg) Medium-sized dogs >40–80 lbs. (>18–36 kg) Large-sized dogs over 80 lbs. (>36 kg).  MOVOFLEX Soft Chews are packaged in jars containing 60 soft chews.

  • How often do I give my dog MOVOFLEX® Soft Chews?

    MOVOFLEX Soft Chews should be administered once daily and can be given during or after a meal.

  • What is the flavoring of RILEXINE® (cephalexin tablets) Chewable Tablets?

    It is a poultry liver flavor.

    RILEXINE® (cephalexin tablets) Chewable Tablets - Contraindicated in dogs with a known allergy to penicillins or cephalosporins. For oral use in dogs only. Not for use in humans. Individuals sensitive to penicillins or cephalosporins should avoid contact of the product with the skin and mucous membranes. Do not prescribe in the absence of a proven or strongly suspected bacterial infection. Safety in breeding, pregnant, or lactating bitches has not been evaluated. The most common adverse reactions in dogs include vomiting, diarrhea, anorexia and lethargy. Please see full product label.

  • Can RILEXINE® (cephalexin tablets) Chewable Tablets be used in cats?

    RILEXINE Tablets are labeled for use in dogs only.

    RILEXINE® (cephalexin tablets) Chewable Tablets - Contraindicated in dogs with a known allergy to penicillins or cephalosporins. For oral use in dogs only. Not for use in humans. Individuals sensitive to penicillins or cephalosporins should avoid contact of the product with the skin and mucous membranes. Do not prescribe in the absence of a proven or strongly suspected bacterial infection. Safety in breeding, pregnant, or lactating bitches has not been evaluated. The most common adverse reactions in dogs include vomiting, diarrhea, anorexia and lethargy. Please see full product label.

  • What is the flavoring of TUMIL-K® (potassium gluconate) Powder?

    It is a pork liver flavor.

  • Are TUMIL-K® (potassium gluconate) Tablets flavored?

    TUMIL-K Tablets are not flavored.

  • What is the fiber source for VETASYL® Fiber Capsules?

    Psyllium husks are the source of fiber.

  • Is the fiber in VETASYL® Fiber Capsules soluble or insoluble?

    The fiber is soluble.

  • How many calories are in one capsule of VETASYL® Fiber Capsules?

    Each capsule contains 0.4 kcal.

  • Can VIRBANTEL® (pyrantel pamoate/praziquantel) Flavored Chewables be given to cats?

    VIRBANTEL Chewables are labeled for use in dogs only. Virbac does not have any safety or efficacy studies for use in cats. Virbac recommends that pet owners contact their veterinarian regarding appropriate parasite control for their cats.

    VIRBANTEL® (pyrantel pamoate/praziquantel) Flavored Chewables - For use in puppies and dogs 12 weeks of age or older. Do not use in sick animals. Vomiting, loose stools (with or without blood), and decreased activity have been reported with use. Safety in breeding dogs and pregnant bitches has not been evaluated.  Please see full product label.

  • Do VIRBANTEL® (pyrantel pamoate/praziquantel) Flavored Chewables have any age restrictions?

    VIRBANTEL® (pyrantel pamoate/praziquantel) Flavored Chewables - For use in puppies and dogs 12 weeks of age or older. Do not use in sick animals. Vomiting, loose stools (with or without blood), and decreased activity have been reported with use. Safety in breeding dogs and pregnant bitches has not been evaluated.  Please see full product label.

  • What does one dose of VIRBANTEL® (pyrantel pamoate/praziquantel) Flavored Chewables do for dogs?

    VIRBANTEL Chewables treat and control the adult stages of roundworms (Toxocara canis, Toxascaris leonina), hookworms (Ancylostoma caninum, Uncinaria stenocephala, Ancylostoma braziliense) and tapeworms (Dipylidium caninum, Taenia pisiformis).

    VIRBANTEL® (pyrantel pamoate/praziquantel) Flavored Chewables - For use in puppies and dogs 12 weeks of age or older. Do not use in sick animals. Vomiting, loose stools (with or without blood), and decreased activity have been reported with use. Safety in breeding dogs and pregnant bitches has not been evaluated.  Please see full product label.

  • Why should I clean my cat’s ears?

    Although cats tend to be good groomers, it is not easy for them to clean the inside of their ears. This can cause excess wax, dirt, and debris to build up inside the ear, increasing the risk of your cat developing an ear infection. Periodic inspections and ear cleanings may help reduce the chance of ear infections and keep your cat’s ears healthy.

  • How often should I clean my cat’s ears?

    Most cats will need ear cleaning only when there is a noticeable build-up of wax, dirt, or debris inside the ear. Ask your veterinarian how often you should clean your cat’s ears. A proper ear cleanser will be gentle enough to use regularly, or as directed by your veterinarian.

  • How do I clean my cat’s ears?

    1. Always use a veterinarian-recommended cleansing solution.

    2. Be gentle! Your cat’s ear canals and flaps are sensitive, and overly aggressive cleanings may cause serious damage to the delicate structures of your cat’s inner-ear.

    3. Begin by dribbling a small amount (enough to fill the canal but not overflow) of your ear cleaning solution into the ear.

    4. Massage gently for 5 to 10 seconds at the ear base as the solution drips deep into the ear canal. You will probably hear the solution squish around as you massage, which is normal. This step should not be painful for your cat.

    5. Use a cotton ball to gentle wipe away excess fluid and clean the external ear. DO NOT USE COTTON-TIPPED APPLICATORS.

    6. Repeat the process with your cat’s other ear.

  • Why is it important to use a veterinarian-recommended ear cleanser?

    A veterinarian-recommended ear cleanser is one designed specifically for pets. It will be powerful yet gentle enough for routine use, with a neutral pH and a non-irritating formula. A professionally recommended ear cleanser will also keep ears smelling fresh, remove excessive ear wax, and will be able to be used before application of other ear products. Avoid using cleansers that contain significant amounts of alcohol, have an overly acidic or basic pH, or contain hydrogen peroxide as all of these things can irritate your cat's ears, especially if used often.

  • Should I clean my cat's ears at home?

    Yes! Regular ear cleaning should be part of your cat's at-home grooming routine. Get step-by-step instructions on how to clean your cat's ears.

  • What is otitis externa?

    Otitis externa is one of the most common ear infections. The condition involves inflammation of the outer ear canal. The outer ear becomes red and swollen. This causes bacteria and yeast, usually present in low numbers in the ear canal, to grow abundantly, causing infection. This sets up an environment where bacteria and yeast can overgrow their normal levels, creating an unhealthy infection that magnifies the inflammation of the ears. Without intervention this becomes a vicious cycle.3

     

    References: 1. State of Pet Health 2016 Report. Banfield Pet Hospital website. Available at: https://www.banfield.com/banfield/media/PDF/downloads/soph/banfieldstate-

    of-pet-health-report-2016.pdf. Accessed July 20, 2020. 2. Roy J, Bedard C, Moreau M. Treatment of feline otitis externa due to Otodectes cynotis and complicated by secondary bacterial and fungal infections with Oridermyl auricular ointment. Can Vet J. 2011;52:277–282. 3. Otitis externa in cats. Merck Veterinary Manual website. Available at: https://www.merckvetmanual.com/cat-owners/ear-disorders-of-cats/otitis-externa-in-cats. Accessed July 23, 2020. 4. Overview of otitis externa. Merck Veterinary Manual website. Available at: https://www.merckvetmanual.com/ear-disorders/otitis-externa/overview-of-otitis-externa. Accessed July 21, 2020. 5. Ear infections in cats. ASPCA Pet Insurance website. Available at: https://www.aspcapetinsurance.com/resources/ear-infections-in-cats/. Accessed July 20, 2020.

  • Which cats are prone to ear infections?

    All cats can get ear infections, but certain cats may be at higher risk, including cats with allergies, cats with certain health conditions, such as diabetes or feline leukemia, and cats with small, outer ears, such as Himalayans or Persians.5

     

    References: 1. State of Pet Health 2016 Report. Banfield Pet Hospital website. Available at: https://www.banfield.com/banfield/media/PDF/downloads/soph/banfieldstate-

    of-pet-health-report-2016.pdf. Accessed July 20, 2020. 2. Roy J, Bedard C, Moreau M. Treatment of feline otitis externa due to Otodectes cynotis and complicated by secondary bacterial and fungal infections with Oridermyl auricular ointment. Can Vet J. 2011;52:277–282. 3. Otitis externa in cats. Merck Veterinary Manual website. Available at: https://www.merckvetmanual.com/cat-owners/ear-disorders-of-cats/otitis-externa-in-cats. Accessed July 23, 2020. 4. Overview of otitis externa. Merck Veterinary Manual website. Available at: https://www.merckvetmanual.com/ear-disorders/otitis-externa/overview-of-otitis-externa. Accessed July 21, 2020. 5. Ear infections in cats. ASPCA Pet Insurance website. Available at: https://www.aspcapetinsurance.com/resources/ear-infections-in-cats/. Accessed July 20, 2020.

  • Are ear infections in cats painful?

    Yes, ear infections can cause significant pain in cats.3,4

     

    References: 1. State of Pet Health 2016 Report. Banfield Pet Hospital website. Available at: https://www.banfield.com/banfield/media/PDF/downloads/soph/banfieldstate-

    of-pet-health-report-2016.pdf. Accessed July 20, 2020. 2. Roy J, Bedard C, Moreau M. Treatment of feline otitis externa due to Otodectes cynotis and complicated by secondary bacterial and fungal infections with Oridermyl auricular ointment. Can Vet J. 2011;52:277–282. 3. Otitis externa in cats. Merck Veterinary Manual website. Available at: https://www.merckvetmanual.com/cat-owners/ear-disorders-of-cats/otitis-externa-in-cats. Accessed July 23, 2020. 4. Overview of otitis externa. Merck Veterinary Manual website. Available at: https://www.merckvetmanual.com/ear-disorders/otitis-externa/overview-of-otitis-externa. Accessed July 21, 2020. 5. Ear infections in cats. ASPCA Pet Insurance website. Available at: https://www.aspcapetinsurance.com/resources/ear-infections-in-cats/. Accessed July 20, 2020.

  • How do I know if my cat has an ear infection?

    Common signs of an ear infection include frequent shaking of the head, pawing at the ear, discharge from the ear, redness or swelling of the ear canal, odor, or tilting the head to one side.3,5  If you suspect your cat has an ear infection, make an appointment with your veterinarian right away.

     

    References: 1. State of Pet Health 2016 Report. Banfield Pet Hospital website. Available at: https://www.banfield.com/banfield/media/PDF/downloads/soph/banfieldstate-

    of-pet-health-report-2016.pdf. Accessed July 20, 2020. 2. Roy J, Bedard C, Moreau M. Treatment of feline otitis externa due to Otodectes cynotis and complicated by secondary bacterial and fungal infections with Oridermyl auricular ointment. Can Vet J. 2011;52:277–282. 3. Otitis externa in cats. Merck Veterinary Manual website. Available at: https://www.merckvetmanual.com/cat-owners/ear-disorders-of-cats/otitis-externa-in-cats. Accessed July 23, 2020. 4. Overview of otitis externa. Merck Veterinary Manual website. Available at: https://www.merckvetmanual.com/ear-disorders/otitis-externa/overview-of-otitis-externa. Accessed July 21, 2020. 5. Ear infections in cats. ASPCA Pet Insurance website. Available at: https://www.aspcapetinsurance.com/resources/ear-infections-in-cats/. Accessed July 20, 2020.

  • Why does my cat keep getting ear infections?

    Some cats are prone to ear infections. These include cats with allergies, cats with certain health conditions, such as diabetes or feline leukemia, and cats with small, outer ears, such as Himalayans or Persians.5 Your veterinarian will collect a detailed history to help uncover any underlying causes of your cat’s ear infection and to properly treat your cat to help keep the infection from recurring.

     

    References: 1. State of Pet Health 2016 Report. Banfield Pet Hospital website. Available at: https://www.banfield.com/banfield/media/PDF/downloads/soph/banfieldstate-

    of-pet-health-report-2016.pdf. Accessed July 20, 2020. 2. Roy J, Bedard C, Moreau M. Treatment of feline otitis externa due to Otodectes cynotis and complicated by secondary bacterial and fungal infections with Oridermyl auricular ointment. Can Vet J. 2011;52:277–282. 3. Otitis externa in cats. Merck Veterinary Manual website. Available at: https://www.merckvetmanual.com/cat-owners/ear-disorders-of-cats/otitis-externa-in-cats. Accessed July 23, 2020. 4. Overview of otitis externa. Merck Veterinary Manual website. Available at: https://www.merckvetmanual.com/ear-disorders/otitis-externa/overview-of-otitis-externa. Accessed July 21, 2020. 5. Ear infections in cats. ASPCA Pet Insurance website. Available at: https://www.aspcapetinsurance.com/resources/ear-infections-in-cats/. Accessed July 20, 2020.

  • Why should I visit my veterinarian if I suspect my cat has an ear infection?

    Most ear infections are the result of an underlying problem. Your veterinarian will be able to uncover the primary reason for your cat’s ear infection and treat it appropriately.

  • How are ear infections treated?

    Your veterinarian will develop a treatment plan based on your cat’s needs. In most cases, cleaning and medicating the ear canal, using a treatment designed specifically for cats, will clear up your cat’s ear infection. In some cases, surgery may be needed for chronic infections.

  • How often should I clean my dog’s ears?

    Ask your veterinarian how frequently you should clean your dog’s ears. A proper ear cleanser will be powerful gentle enough to use regularly—about 2 to 3 times per week, or as directed by your veterinarian. All dogs need regular ear cleaning but dogs prone to ear infections may need more frequent cleanings.

  • Can I use a cotton-tipped applicator to clean my dog’s ears?

    No. Using a cotton-tipped applicator may damage your dog’s ears. Instead, follow the instructions above for how to properly clean your dog’s ears.

  • Should I use and ear cleanser after my dog swims or gets wet?

    It is a good idea to clean your dog’s ears after swimming since moisture in the ear can lead to problems, such as inflammation or infection. An effective ear cleanser will have a drying effect to discourage moisture from accumulating in the ear.

  • Will an ear cleanser irritate my dog’s ears?

    Because there are many ear cleansers to choose from, it is important to look for a veterinarian-recommended cleanser, which is designed specifically for pets. A professionally recommended ear cleanser will be gentle enough for routine use, with a neutral pH and a non-irritating formula. It will also keep ears smelling fresh, remove excessive ear wax, and will be able to be used before application of other ear products. Avoid using cleansers that contain significant amounts of alcohol, have an acidic pH, or contain hydrogen peroxide as all of these things can irritate your dogs ears, especially if used often.

  • Should I clean my dog’s ears if my dog has an ear infection?

    If you suspect that your dog has an ear infection, you should schedule a visit to the veterinarian to get a firm diagnosis and treatment plan. The treatment plan will include instructions on other products to apply, if needed, and when to clean ears.

  • Why are ear infections common in dogs?

    The ear canal of a dog is different than that of a human. It is deeper and more angled, like the letter “L,” which means that debris must work its way up to exit the ear, rather than straight out as in the human ear.

  • What is otitis externa?

    Otitis externa is one of the most common ear infections in dogs. The condition involves inflammation of the outer ear canal. The outer ear becomes red and swollen. This causes bacteria and yeast, usually present in low numbers in the ear canal, to grow abundantly, causing infection. 

  • Which dogs are prone to ear infections?

    All dogs can get ear infections, but certain dogs are prone to them, including dogs with allergies, dogs with long or floppy ears, and dogs that like to swim or get wet.2

     

    References: 1. Pet ear infections. Nationwide Insurance website. Available at: https://phz8.petinsurance.com/pet-health/health-conditions/pet-ear-infections. Accessed July 21, 2020. 2. Overview of otitis externa. Merck Veterinary Manual website. Available at: https://www.merckvetmanual.com/ear-disorders/otitis-externa/overview-of-otitis-externa. Accessed August 7, 2020. 3. Paterson S. Discovering the causes of otitis externa. In Practice website. Available at: https://inpractice.bmj.com/content/38/Suppl_2/7. Accessed August 7, 2020. 4. Nuttall T. Successful management of otitis externa. In Pract. 2016;38(Suppl 1):17–21.

  • Why is controlling inflammation so important?

    Ongoing inflammation in the ear can lead to recurrent infection that may become harder to treat over time. Chronic inflammation can also cause changes in the ear that may worsen ear problems and make surgery necessary.4

     

    References: 1. Pet ear infections. Nationwide Insurance website. Available at: https://phz8.petinsurance.com/pet-health/health-conditions/pet-ear-infections. Accessed July 21, 2020. 2. Overview of otitis externa. Merck Veterinary Manual website. Available at: https://www.merckvetmanual.com/ear-disorders/otitis-externa/overview-of-otitis-externa. Accessed August 7, 2020. 3. Paterson S. Discovering the causes of otitis externa. In Practice website. Available at: https://inpractice.bmj.com/content/38/Suppl_2/7. Accessed August 7, 2020. 4. Nuttall T. Successful management of otitis externa. In Pract. 2016;38(Suppl 1):17–21.

  • Which types of allergies can cause ear infections?

    Skin allergy, which is caused by allergens in the air, such as pollen, is the most common type of allergy triggering ear infections in dogs. Other types include food allergy and contact allergy, which is caused by direct contact with an allergen that can irritate the skin.3

     

    References: 1. Pet ear infections. Nationwide Insurance website. Available at: https://phz8.petinsurance.com/pet-health/health-conditions/pet-ear-infections. Accessed July 21, 2020. 2. Overview of otitis externa. Merck Veterinary Manual website. Available at: https://www.merckvetmanual.com/ear-disorders/otitis-externa/overview-of-otitis-externa. Accessed August 7, 2020. 3. Paterson S. Discovering the causes of otitis externa. In Practice website. Available at: https://inpractice.bmj.com/content/38/Suppl_2/7. Accessed August 7, 2020. 4. Nuttall T. Successful management of otitis externa. In Pract. 2016;38(Suppl 1):17–21.

  • What are ear mites?

    Ear mites are tiny mites that live on the surface of the skin, usually in the ear canal. They are a common cause of disease and infection and are very contagious.

  • Am I able to see ear mites in my dog’s ears?

    Ear mites are barely visible to the human eye. Usually, your veterinarian will be able to see the mites using an otoscope, or they will be visible in the ear discharge using a microscope.

  • What problems do ear mites cause?

    Ear mites can cause intense itching and head shaking in your dog. Ears can become red and swollen and rashes or other skin disorders can occur on the skin around the ears.1,2

     

    References: 1. Mite infestations. Merck Veterinary Manual website. Available at: https://www.merckvetmanual.com/ear-disorders/diseases-of-the-pinna/mite-infestations. Accessed July 21, 2020. 2. Ear mites. Pets and Parasites website. Available at: https://www.petsandparasites.org/dog-owners/ear-mites/. Accessed July 21, 2020.

     

  • Can my dog transmit ear mites to me?

    Although ear mites can easily travel from one pet to another, ear mites are generally not considered to be a risk to people.

  • How are ear mites treated?

    Ear mites can be successfully treated by medication. Schedule an appointment with your veterinarian to discuss the best ear mite treatment for your dog.

  • If only one of my pets has been diagnosed with ear mites, why should all the pets in my household be treated?

    Ear mites are very contagious, which is why all pets in your household (both dogs and cats) should be treated at the same time.

  • Can ear mites live in my dog’s bedding or surroundings?

    Ear mites can survive off your dog for a variable amount of time. That’s why all bedding, brushes, and furniture that your dog comes into contact with should be treated, as well. Ask your veterinarian how best to treat your home.1

     

    References: 1. Mite infestations. Merck Veterinary Manual website. Available at: https://www.merckvetmanual.com/ear-disorders/diseases-of-the-pinna/mite-infestations. Accessed July 21, 2020. 2. Ear mites. Pets and Parasites website. Available at: https://www.petsandparasites.org/dog-owners/ear-mites/. Accessed July 21, 2020.

  • Why does my dog keep getting ear infections?

    Some dogs are prone to ear infections. These include dogs with allergies, dogs with long or floppy ears, and dogs that like to swim or get wet.1 In addition, an underlying condition, such as allergies, can cause ear infections. In fact, allergies are the number one cause of ear infections.3 Your veterinarian will collect a detailed history to help uncover any underlying causes of your dog’s ear infection and to properly treat your dog to help keep the infection from recurring.

     

    References: 1. Overview of otitis externa. Merck Veterinary Manual website. Available at: https://www.merckvetmanual.com/ear-disorders/otitis-externa/overview-of-otitis-externa. Accessed August 7, 2020. ‌‌2. Bajwa J. Canine otitis externa: treatment and complications. Vet Derm. 2019;60:97–99. 3. Paterson S. Discovering the causes of otitis externa. In Practice website. Available at: https://inpractice.bmj.com/content/38/Suppl_2/7. Accessed August 7, 2020. 4. Allweiler S. Types of pain. Merck Veterinary Manual website. Available at: https://www.merckvetmanual.com/special-pet-topics/pain-management/types-of-pain. Accessed September 9, 2020.

  • How do I know if my dog has an ear infection?

    Common signs of an ear infection include frequent scratching or rubbing of the ears, discharge from the ear, redness or swelling of the ear canal, and odor.1 If you suspect your dog has an ear infection, make an appointment with your veterinarian right away.

     

    References: 1. Overview of otitis externa. Merck Veterinary Manual website. Available at: https://www.merckvetmanual.com/ear-disorders/otitis-externa/overview-of-otitis-externa. Accessed August 7, 2020. ‌‌2. Bajwa J. Canine otitis externa: treatment and complications. Vet Derm. 2019;60:97–99. 3. Paterson S. Discovering the causes of otitis externa. In Practice website. Available at: https://inpractice.bmj.com/content/38/Suppl_2/7. Accessed August 7, 2020. 4. Allweiler S. Types of pain. Merck Veterinary Manual website. Available at: https://www.merckvetmanual.com/special-pet-topics/pain-management/types-of-pain. Accessed September 9, 2020.

  • Is it possible for my dog to have infection in only one ear?

    Yes, ear infections may occur in either one or both ears.1

    References: 1. Overview of otitis externa. Merck Veterinary Manual website. Available at: https://www.merckvetmanual.com/ear-disorders/otitis-externa/overview-of-otitis-externa. Accessed August 7, 2020. ‌‌2. Bajwa J. Canine otitis externa: treatment and complications. Vet Derm. 2019;60:97–99. 3. Paterson S. Discovering the causes of otitis externa. In Practice website. Available at: https://inpractice.bmj.com/content/38/Suppl_2/7. Accessed August 7, 2020. 4. Allweiler S. Types of pain. Merck Veterinary Manual website. Available at: https://www.merckvetmanual.com/special-pet-topics/pain-management/types-of-pain. Accessed September 9, 2020.

  • How can I tell if an ear infection is causing my dog pain?

    Pain is not always easy to identify in dogs. In addition to scratching or rubbing the ears, a dog in pain from an ear infection may become lethargic or withdrawn, display a loss of appetite, or become moody or irritable.4 If you notice an behavioral changes in your dog that concern you, contact your veterinarian.

    References: 1. Overview of otitis externa. Merck Veterinary Manual website. Available at: https://www.merckvetmanual.com/ear-disorders/otitis-externa/overview-of-otitis-externa. Accessed August 7, 2020. ‌‌2. Bajwa J. Canine otitis externa: treatment and complications. Vet Derm. 2019;60:97–99. 3. Paterson S. Discovering the causes of otitis externa. In Practice website. Available at: https://inpractice.bmj.com/content/38/Suppl_2/7. Accessed August 7, 2020. 4. Allweiler S. Types of pain. Merck Veterinary Manual website. Available at: https://www.merckvetmanual.com/special-pet-topics/pain-management/types-of-pain. Accessed September 9, 2020.

  • Why should I visit my veterinarian if I suspect my dog has an ear infection?

    Your veterinarian will be able to uncover the primary reason for your dog’s ear infection and recommend a treatment plan specifically designed for dogs, and your dog in particular.

     

    References: 1. Overview of otitis externa. Merck Veterinary Manual website. Available at: https://www.merckvetmanual.com/ear-disorders/otitis-externa/overview-of-otitis-externa. Accessed August 7, 2020. ‌‌2. Bajwa J. Canine otitis externa: treatment and complications. Vet Derm. 2019;60:97–99. 3. Paterson S. Discovering the causes of otitis externa. In Practice website. Available at: https://inpractice.bmj.com/content/38/Suppl_2/7. Accessed August 7, 2020. 4. Allweiler S. Types of pain. Merck Veterinary Manual website. Available at: https://www.merckvetmanual.com/special-pet-topics/pain-management/types-of-pain. Accessed September 9, 2020.

  • What if my dog is in too much pain for a physical examination?

    Your veterinarian will be able to determine your dog’s level of pain using a gentle touch. If the discomfort is too great, your dog may need to be sedated before any further testing is performed.1

     

    ‌‌References: 1. Overview of otitis externa. Merck Veterinary Manual website. Available at: https://www.merckvetmanual.com/ear-disorders/otitis-externa/overview-of-otitis-externa. Accessed September 9, 2020. 2. Bajwa J. Canine otitis externa: treatment and complications. Vet Derm. 2019;60:97–99.

  • How will my dog’s ear infection be treated?

    Your veterinarian will develop a treatment plan based on your dog’s needs. In most cases, cleaning and medicating the ear canal will quickly clear up your dog’s ear infection. In some cases, surgery may be needed for chronic infections or if forceful head shaking results in the rupture of a vessel within the outer part of the ear.

  • Can I treat my dog’s ear infection at home?

    You will need to visit your veterinarian to have your dog’s ear infection properly diagnosed. But once you are given treatment by your veterinarian, you can administer that treatment at home.

  • Can I wait to see if my dog’s ear infection goes away on its own?

    It is important that your dog be treated for an ear infection right away. Left untreated, ear infections can cause progressive changes in the ear that can lead to chronic, or lifelong, ear disease.2

     

    ‌‌References: 1. Overview of otitis externa. Merck Veterinary Manual website. Available at: https://www.merckvetmanual.com/ear-disorders/otitis-externa/overview-of-otitis-externa. Accessed September 9, 2020. 2. Bajwa J. Canine otitis externa: treatment and complications. Vet Derm. 2019;60:97–99.

  • Are ear mites painful?

    Yes, ear mites can cause intense itching. Ears can become red and swollen and rashes or other skin disorders can occur on the skin around the ears.1,2

     

    References: 1. Otitis externa in cats. Merck Veterinary Manual website. Available at: https://www.merckvetmanual.com/cat-owners/ear-disorders-of-cats/otitis-externa-in-cats. Accessed July 23, 2020. 2. Ear infections in cats. ASPCA Pet Insurance website. Available at: https://www.aspcapetinsurance.com/resources/ear-infections-in-cats/. Accessed July 20, 2020. 3. Ear mites. Pets and Parasites website. Available at: www.petsandparasites.org/cat-owners/ear-mites/. Accessed October 19, 2020.

  • How are ear mites diagnosed?

    Your veterinarian will be able to diagnose ear mites. Usually, the mites can be seen with an otoscope or on swabs of the ear canal observed under a microscope.

  • How are ear mites transmitted?

    Ear mites are very contagious and can easily travel from the ears of an infected cat to other pets in close contact. This can happen when pets are grooming, sleeping, or playing together.

  • Can my cat transmit ear mites to me?

    Ear mites are generally not considered to be a risk to people.3

     

    References: 1. Otitis externa in cats. Merck Veterinary Manual website. Available at: https://www.merckvetmanual.com/cat-owners/ear-disorders-of-cats/otitis-externa-in-cats. Accessed July 23, 2020. 2. Ear infections in cats. ASPCA Pet Insurance website. Available at: https://www.aspcapetinsurance.com/resources/ear-infections-in-cats/. Accessed July 20, 2020. 3. Ear mites. Pets and Parasites website. Available at: www.petsandparasites.org/cat-owners/ear-mites/. Accessed October 19, 2020.

  • Can my indoor cat get ear mites?

    Even though ear mites are more common in outdoor cats, indoor cats can be affected if they come into contact with another infected cat or the bedding or toys of an infected cat.